giba_miranda

Giba Miranda Miranda itibaren 01211 Santurde, Araba, İspanya itibaren 01211 Santurde, Araba, İspanya

Okuyucu Giba Miranda Miranda itibaren 01211 Santurde, Araba, İspanya

Giba Miranda Miranda itibaren 01211 Santurde, Araba, İspanya

giba_miranda

A sad book because it is based loosely on facts: the (colonial) farmers own most of the arable farm land and have done so for generations. Under the guise of giving the farm land back to the indiginous people, the land is forcefully taken back, regardless of the cost to the (colonial) owners. There are no consequences if they are killed in the process. However, the farm land is not given to the indiginous farmers but taken over by greedy politicians using it as a status symbol - the farm allowed to go to ruin. So this is a story of Davey who's parents are murdered in such an attack whereas he survived because he was in the attic at the time. He is on a guilt-trip because he witnessed part of the murder but went into hiding instead of trying to defend the family. I appreciated the use of colloguial names throughout the book. Words like stoep, vlei, donga, kraal, kopjie, boerewors, braai. There are many more and anyone raised in Southern Africa will understand their meaning. Other readers however may not. The author does however explain some of the more obscure words like "kapenta". All in all an excellent book though I did feel that Davey, as a teenaged boy, born and raised on a farm would have more "guts" and sense than what he is portrayed to have. As a final comment, I did not enjoy how the script developed: one would read a second-hand account of an event and then several chapters later, the same event told first-hand. As an example, the final chapter tells how Davey carries out a certain act. However, several chapters earlier the reader already know all about this act though not as seen though Davey' point of view. Maybe it makes good literary sense but I found it frustrating - and would have rearranged the chapters if I could. Still gave it 5-stars anyway!!

giba_miranda

I just re-read this and I think it means more to me know that I am a father. No, I am not a father of a daughter yet. When I recently read the Autobiography of Malcolm X I thought it would be essential for me to encourage my newborn son, in years to come, to read. I have a bit of a pile- Walden Pond, Plutarch, H Rider Haggard, Malcolm X, and now I think this is absolutely essential to make sure my masculine little boy understands. Something I want to highlight- "Literature is open to everybody. I refuse to allow you, Beadle though you are, to turn me off the grass. Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind," p. 75-76. Instead of making her feel inferior, instead of spending all of your energies pushing her down why not, dear son, spend the time and energy lifting her up? Then you can work together, then your work will be so much better. In fact I think this might be good for a men's group. I was at a party once with some of our couple friends. We played that game, "Battle of the sexes" (I find it trite and stupid). They were so impressed with me that I knew what the reference "A room of one's own" referred to. It made me sad, this book should be common knowledge. To BOTH men and women. Come on, people, let's stop being stupid.